Since 1966, Shriver Hall Concert Series has created a legacy of outstanding performances. Now you can express your commitment to preserving this legacy for future audiences through a planned gift to The Dr. Ernest Bueding Legacy Society.

Planned Giving: Getting Started

We hope you'll consider including a gift to Shriver Hall Concert Series (SHCS) in your will or living trust. A planned gift may enable you to make a more significant contribution than you previously thought possible, while allowing you to meet other financial and philanthropic goals. Called a charitable bequest, this type of gift offers these notable benefits:

  • Simplicity: A simple sentence in your will is all that is needed to help secure a promising future for the Series: "I, «Name», of «City, State ZIP», give, devise, and bequeath to Shriver Hall Concert Series «written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property» for its unrestricted use and purpose."
  • Flexibility: Since you are not making the gift until after your lifetime, you can change your mind at any time.
  • Versatility: You can identify a specific item, amount of money, make the gift contingent on certain events, or leave a percentage of your estate by structuring the bequest according to your desires.
  • Tax Relief: If your estate is subject to estate tax, a bequest can defray tax burdens on your heirs.

To make a charitable bequest, you'll need a current will or revocable living trust. Your gift can be made as a percentage of your estate. Or you can make a specific bequest by giving a certain amount of cash, securities, or property. After your lifetime, SHCS receives your gift.

Giver Profile

A charitable bequest works for anyone who would like to provide future support SHCS. This type of gift has broad appeal because you can change the amounts or your mind at any time.

  • You want to support SHCS after your lifetime.
  • You are ready to create a will or living trust or you already have one.
  • You want to make a charitable gift while having the flexibility to change your mind.
  • You want estate tax relief.

 

Making Your Gift

  1. Choose what to give
    • Specific bequest identifying a particular piece of property. If you dispose of the property before your death, we won't receive your intended gift because we cannot claim any other property.
    • General bequest gives us a stated sum of money. If there is insufficient cash in your estate to cover the bequest, other assets will be sold for cash to honor your wishes.
    • Residuary bequest gives the remainder of your estate or a percentage thereof after all other bequests, taxes, and debts have been paid.
    • Contingent bequest requires certain event(s) to occur before the gift can be received.
  2. Decide how SHCS should use your gift.
    • Unrestricted Bequest allows us to use the assets in the most beneficial way.
    • Restricted Bequest allows you to specify how funds are used. Be sure to discuss with SCHS staff your intentions so you can be certain that your intentions will be fulfilled.
    • Endowment Bequest restricts the principal of your gift so that SHCS can use only the annual principal, allowing the fund to essentially last forever.
  3. Consult with your estate planning attorney
  4. Inform SHCS of your plans

Other Planned Gifts

  • Gifts of Stock can be a powerful way to contribute to the Series' future while avoiding capital gains taxes on the shares you donate. Through a gift of stock, you will qualify for an income tax deduction for the full appraised value of the stock.
  • Life Insurance Gifts can provide you with the satisfaction of making a very generous donation. After serving its original objective, you might consider giving your Life Insurance policy new life with a charitable purpose. Naming SHCS as a beneficiary while retaining ownership is a powerful way to make a future gift. You can make the Series the sole, partial, or contingent beneficiary of your policy.
  • Retirement Plan Gifts can be made under the extended charitable IRA legislation. If you are 70-1/2 or older at the time of the gift, you may transfer up to $100,000 directly from your IRA without undesirable tax effects.

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